Nov 26, 2020  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions


At North Arkansas College all courses carry identifying department prefixes and numbers that designate the level of the course, whether it is a part of a sequence or a one-semester course.

The numbering system aids students in planning programs. The digits in a course number also indicate the level of the course and whether it will carry college credit. Explanation of that system is as follows:

Digits from Level/Credit Explanation
0001-0999 College Preparatory classes that do not count toward associate degree requirements nor are they intended for transfer.
1000-1999 Freshmen level courses designed for the associate degree at North Arkansas College or for transfer to other institutions of higher education.
2000-2899 Advanced or sophomore level courses required in the associate degree program at North Arkansas College or for transfer to institutions of higher education.
2900-2999 Special project courses, which may carry 1-5 hours credit which may or may not transfer to other institutions.

The college reserves the right to cancel courses each semester for which adequate enrollment cannot be maintained.

The last digit of each four-digit number indicates the number of credit hours for the course.

Courses are alphabetized according to their prefix, not department.

In order for pre-requisite courses to be considered complete, a “C” or better must be obtained.

 

Agriculture

  
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    AGRI 1004 - Introductory Animal and Poultry Science


    Credits: 4
    The lecture portion stresses the importance of animal and poultry production in American agriculture and covers principles of production and management of livestock, poultry, and their products. The lab complements the lecture and includes a study of facilities used in production, processing, and management of animal agriculture. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 1102 - Careers in Agriculture, Food, and Life Sciences


    Credits: 2
    This course offers an orientation to the broad spectrum of careers available in agricultural, food, and life sciences. Lecture 2 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 1114 - Principles of Horticulture


    Credits: 4
    This course teaches the basic principles underlying the propagation, production and handling of horticulture. Topics of discussion range from in-door houseplants to commercial production of fruit and nut trees, vines, and berries. Botany is helpful but not required. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 1204 - Introduction to Plant Science


    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the basics of agricultural crop plant structure, growth, and production. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 2003 - Introduction to Weed Science


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces fundamental, practical concepts of weed control and weed biology, equipment, and techniques used in modern weed control practices. This course also teaches basic recommendations and systems for specific agronomic and horticultural crops. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 2010 - Agriculture Internship


    Credits: 2-3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit while working in an Agricultural or Turf setting with supervised on-the-job training. Arrangements with employers offering internship opportunities will be documented using a North Arkansas College Cooperative Internship form. Credit hours will be granted at the rate of 1 credit per 40 hours of supervised work experience.  Course is repeatable up to three times.
  
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    AGRI 2014 - Pest Management


    Credits: 4
    This course introduces basic principles of pest management as they relate to vertebrate animals, insects, plant diseases, and weeds. Selected pests are studied with emphasis on current management approaches and alternative pest control. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 2023 - Introduction to Equine Industry


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an examination of careers and business opportunities in the equine industry. Students will gain the opportunity to identify high quality horses through evaluation of conformation and locomotion. Students will also gain skill at oral presentation and be knowledgeable of costs and responsibilities associated with horse ownership. Lecture 3 hours.
  
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    AGRI 2143 - Feeds and Feeding


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces principles of animal nutrition, composition, digestibility of feeds, balanced rations, and feeding of farm animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AGRI 1004  
  
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    AGRI 2204 - Soil Science


    Credits: 4
    This course covers the classification and properties of soils - physical, biological, and chemical. It covers the effects on soils by fertilizers and other treatments, planned or unplanned. There will be three hours of lecture per week and two hours of lab/field work per week (minimum of thirty hours per semester). Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1214 or higher with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    AGRI 2213 - Behavior of Domestic Animals


    Credits: 3
    This course covers behavior associated with domestication and the effects of selective breeding, physical and social environments, and the developmental stage on social organization, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior, productivity, and training of domestic animals. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 2303 - Introduction to Turfgrass Management


    Credits: 3
    This introductory course in turfgrass management emphasizes turfgrass growth, adaptation, and management. It presents methods for establishment, fertilization, mowing, cultivation, irrigation, and pest management as well as their impact on culture of lawns, golf courses, athletic fields, and other managed turf areas. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    AGRI 2313 - Introduction to Agribusiness


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of agriculture business within the framework of how the agriculture industry operates and functions in a global economy. It focuses on the basic principles of the issues and concepts that agricultural businesses and markets encounter. The course provides an overview of the economic theories associated with the production, consumption, and marketing of agricultural products as well as the policies designed to achieve efficiency and overall welfare goals in agriculture. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Administration of Justice

  
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    AJ 1003 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    Credits: 3
    The course includes organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies, organization of state and federal court systems, the philosophy and history of law enforcement, and constitutional limitations of law enforcement. It also presents an overview of crime and organized crime, police problems, and police terminology and ethics. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - CRJU 1023 Introduction to Criminal Justice)
  
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    AJ 1053 - Foundations of Criminology


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the various sociological patterns and theories of crime and criminals. The focus is on the incidences, types, causes, consequences and prevention of crime within American Society. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003  
  
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    AJ 2033 - Introduction to Juvenile Delinquency


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the American juvenile justice system. Featured topics include historical perspectives, causation, environmental influences, juvenile justice processes, definition and extent of delinquency, and prevention/treatment methodologies. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003
  
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    AJ 2043 - Community Relations in Law Enforcement


    Credits: 3
    This course covers the various components of human relations utilized in law enforcement and the way those relationships interact and collide with public expectations and sentiment about law enforcement. Focuses on the dynamic nature of police relationships with citizens, other police officers, and how those relationships are crucial to maintaining professional policing in America. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003  
  
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    AJ 2203 - Introduction to Corrections


    Credits: 3
    This course provides a more in-depth introduction to correctional systems beyond the scope of AJ-1003, Intro to Criminal Justice. Topics will include historical evolution of corrections, correctional philosophies, modern practices, procedures and goals of both community-based corrections and institutional corrections. The course will also address contemporary issues facing correctional populations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003  
  
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    AJ 2253 - Criminal Investigation


    Credits: 3
    This course examines the fundamentals and various methods used in criminal investigations, procedures incorporated at crime scenes, collection and presentation of physical evidence, and methods used by police services laboratories. Introduces students to practical criminal investigations and the various components thereof. Focuses on the systematic examination and interpretations of crime scenes and their relationship pertaining to crime and people who commit criminal acts. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003  
  
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    AJ 2263 - Criminal Evidence and Procedure


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an in depth look at the rules of evidence and procedures used within the operational level of law enforcement and other legal professions. Examines criminal procedures, professional conduct of witnesses, and the importance of safeguarding personal constitutional liberties. Introduces students to the various aspects of criminal procedures. It is mostly concerned with United States court decisions and their relevance to arrests, searches/seizures, interrogations, sentencing practices, and civil liabilities. Analyzes legal safeguards and impediments facing legal professionals and how they affect the performance of their duties. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AJ 1003  
  
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    AJ 2500 - Criminal Justice Internship


    Credits: 1-3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit toward the Criminal Justice Associate of Applied Science or Associate of Science degree. Generally, credit will be granted based on 40 hours of supervised work experience for each credit hour. Arrangements with employers offering internship opportunities will be documented using a North Arkansas College Cooperative Internship form. This is a variable credit course which can be taken for 1-3 credit hours and may be repeated for credit up to three times for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Completion of AJ 1003 Introduction to Criminal Justice   with a “C” or better, a minimum of 30 hours college credit with a GPA of at least 3.0 and permission of the Department Chair.

Allied Health

  
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    HP 1014 - Phlebotomy


    Credits: 4
    This course provides the student with principles and techniques of specimen collection by venipuncture and dermal puncture. Other topics include: anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system, safety and handling procedures, healthcare delivery system and laboratory departments and testing, specialized phlebotomy procedures such as therapeutic collections, difficult draws, blood cultures, glucose tolerance testing, arterial blood gas collection, phlebotomy equipment and supplies, communication skills and professionalism. Also included in this course are in depth discussions of HIPAA, medical and legal issues and healthcare law procedures. The student will also learn to perform certain waived tests such glucose screening, urinalysis dipsticks and pregnancy tests. Prerequisite: Enrollment in an Allied Health program or approval of the MLT Director. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    HP 1041 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: 1
    This course studies terminology used in all areas and levels of the health care professions. Emphasis is on understanding with proficiency medical words, their derivatives, and the formation of related terms. Lecture 1 hour per week.
  
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    HP 1042 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: 2
    This course studies terminology used in all areas and levels of the health care professions. Emphasis is on understanding with proficiency medical words, their derivatives, and the formation of related terms. Lecture 2 hours per week.
  
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    HP 1043 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: 3
    This course studies terminology used in all areas and levels of the health care professions. Emphasis is on understanding with proficiency medical words, their derivatives, and the formation of related terms. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    HP 1051 - Cardiac Arrhythmia


    Credits: 1
    This sixteen-week course introduces the interpretation of cardiac arrhythmias designed for health care professionals. The purpose of the course is to assure that accurate interpretation of cardiac rhythms will be made, that life-threatening situations will be recognized, and that appropriate interventions will be initiated according to approved American Heart Association guidelines. Lecture 1 hour per week.
  
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    HP 2003 - Pharmacology


    Credits: 3
    This course gives members of the health care team a thorough and practical understanding of pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic actions, dosage, drug-interactions, and drug terminology. pharmacology. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    HP 2203 - Phlebotomy Practicum


    Credits: 3
    This course consists of supervised experience in an approved clinical site designed to develop skills involved in venipuncture, dermal puncture, specialized phlebotomy techniques, specimen transport, and handling and processing, as well as to develop entry-level computer skills and other tasks expected of a phlebotomy technician. A minimum of 100 hours of clinical training is required with a minimum of 100 successful venipuncture’s, 25 successful dermal punctures, and orientation in the laboratory. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be eligible to take the Phlebotomy Certificate Examination. This course will be offered on demand only. Clinical hours 100 per semester, average 7 per week but flexible. Pre/Co-requisites 18 years of age or older.

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 2023 - Cultural Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    This course continues the introduction to anthropology concentrating on the key concepts, methods, and theories of cultural diversity, social institutions, linguistics and an examination of people and cultures across the world. This course can also be paired with the yearly Short-Term Study Abroad trip; thus, the country of ethnographic focus of the course will be the country being visited each year. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACTS Department/Number/Title - ANTH 2013 Cultural Anthropology

Art

  
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    ART 1003 - Art Appreciation


    Credits: 3
    This course develops enjoyment and understanding of art as relevant to society and world cultures through the study and subsequent analysis of architecture, sculpture, drawing, and painting. Honors section available. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ARTA 1003 Art Appreciation)
  
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    ART 1103 - Basic Design I (Two Dimensional)


    Credits: 3
    This is a practical study of perception and the elements and principles of design as a basis for all creative work in the visual arts. Emphasis is placed on two-dimensional design including color theory including a section on creative poster and interior/exterior design. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 1113 - Basic Design II (Sculpture)


    Credits: 3
    This course is the same as Basic Design I, with emphasis placed on three-dimensional design (sculpture) in such media as paper, cardboard, plaster, and clay, and includes carving, modeling, and assemblage. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 1203 - Drawing I


    Credits: 3
    This course concentrates on composing drawing in a variety of media including pencil, pen, brush, and conte crayon. Included is the study of anatomy, shading techniques, and perspective, including still life, landscape, and figure-study. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 1213 - Drawing II


    Credits: 3
    This course further investigates the principles of drawing through advanced use of media and technique. Emphasis is placed on gesture, proportion, volume, and developing a personal style. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 1203  
  
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    ART 1303 - Photography I


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces photographic imaging with an overview of digital and film photography and its history, and includes techniques of photo craftsmanship, composition, cameras, lenses, exposure, focus, printing, lighting, and limited photo editing. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 1313 - Photography II


    Credits: 3
    This course continues the development of technical control, analysis of picture structure, and individual modes of expression within various disciplines of photography. Students will be introduced to digital photo editing as well as traditional darkroom techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 1303  
  
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    ART 2103 - Ceramics I


    Credits: 3
    This is an introductory course designed to offer the student an opportunity to explore ceramic media and processes. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on assignments, students will be able to develop a basic understanding of ceramic materials, forming techniques and rudimentary studio practices. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 2113 - Ceramics II


    Credits: 3
    This is an advanced study into the concepts and practices involved in the ceramic making process. Students will further their development with a directed study focusing on wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 2103  
  
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    ART 2123 - Art History I


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and media from prehistoric to Renaissance periods. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACTS Department/Number/Title - ARTA 2003 Art History Survey I
  
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    ART 2203 - Painting I


    Credits: 3
    This is a basic, creative approach to painting, including preparation of canvas and other painting surfaces, color mixing, and techniques for work in still life, landscape and portrait, etc. The student has a choice of media. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    ART 2213 - Painting II


    Credits: 3
    This is the same as ART 2203  but for more advanced study. Individuals have a choice of subject matter and media. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 2203  
  
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    ART 2223 - Art History II


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and media from the Renaissance to the present time. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACTS Department/Number/Title - ARTA 2103 Art History Survey II

Automotive Service Technology

  
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    AST 1104 - Gasoline Engine Repair


    Credits: 4
    This course provides the student with an introduction to automotive engines, the use and care of hand tools, precision tools, special tools and equipment. Construction and theory of operation with attention to engine components are included. In addition, cooling and lubrication of modern engines as well as preventative maintenance and use of shop and flat rate manuals are covered. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 6 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021  
  
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    AST 1203 - Automotive Electronics I


    Credits: 3
    This course assumes a sound understanding of basic electronic concepts and test equipment. Topics include theory and operation of electronic control systems, including sensors, actuators, and microprocessor-based scanned control systems. Additionally, power generation, conditioning, and distribution will be covered. This course together with ART 2203  Automotive Electronics II provides the preparation necessary for students to obtain ASE Certification in the area of Automotive Electronics. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ET 1003  or higher ET course or permission of instructor.
  
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    AST 1403 - Automatic Transmission


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed to cover diagnosis and repair of the mechanical and electronic components on a late model vehicles transmission and transaxle transmissions. This course covers diagnosing differences in engine performance problems and transmission problems. Included are principles of hydraulics, gear reduction and the diagnosis and repair of computer and electronic shifting systems. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week.
  
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    AST 1503 - Manual Drive Trains and Axles


    Credits: 3
    This course covers the entire power train on a late model vehicle with a standard transmission. Beginning with the flywheel, the course traces the flow of power from engine through the flywheel, to the transmission, through the differential assembly and ending at the wheel hub. Included is the principle of gear reduction as it applies to the theory, operation, and repair of manual transmissions, rear axles, and transaxles. Several types of four-wheel drive systems will also be taught. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week.
  
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    AST 1604 - Automotive Brake Systems


    Credits: 4
    This course concentrates on the theory and operation of disc and drum brake systems. Basic hydraulic principles as well as the operation and components of the brake foundation system are taught. This course includes an in-depth study of the various types of power brake systems, including vacuum suspended systems, Hydro-Boost ™ systems, and several types of anti-lock braking systems. Lecture 3 and laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021  
  
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    AST 1704 - Engine Performance I


    Credits: 4
    This course concentrates on fuel, ignition, and emission systems and is closely linked with AST 1203 - Automotive Electronics I . Troubleshooting and repair of these systems on trainers and vehicles is emphasized. This course and AST 2304 - Engine Performance II  provide the preparation necessary for students to obtain ASE Certification in the area of Engine Performance. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 6 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites Corequisite: AST 1203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    AST 2103 - Automotive Climate Control


    Credits: 3
    This course begins the study of the theory of refrigeration. The refrigeration cycle and the basic components and construction of compressors, lines, expansion valves, expansion tubes, condensers, evaporators, blower motors, and air distribution systems are covered. Time will be devoted to the study of automatic temperature control systems including the latest computer monitored systems. Heating and ventilation, an important part of the vehicle’s climate control system, will also be covered. Service and maintenance procedures as well as basic safety are heavily emphasized. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites  AST 1203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    AST 2203 - Automotive Electronics II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of AST 1203  and emphasizes diagnosis and repair of faults in modern automotive control systems. Extensive trainer and vehicle-based troubleshooting will be performed. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AST 1203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    AST 2304 - Engine Performance II


    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of AST 1704 - Engine Performance I . Understanding the contribution that each control system makes to the “driveability” of a vehicle will be emphasized. Extensive time will be devoted to developing systematic methods of diagnosis and repair with the use of trainers and vehicles. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 6 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites AST 1704  or permission of instructor.
  
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    AST 2704 - Automotive Suspension & Steering


    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the student to the theory and operation of modern suspension and steering systems. The study of the suspension system includes wheels and tires, hubs, bearings, seals, springs, and the vehicle frame. Various designs and construction of each of these components will be covered. Suspension and steering systems start with the basic theory of steering geometry and all related factors. Wheel alignment of both front and rear wheels and the construction and operation of the various manual and power steering components is included. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): AST 1604  

Business Administration

  
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    BA 1003 - Introduction to Business


    Credits: 3
    This course surveys the field of business administration in such functional areas as marketing, production, business organizations and ownership, financial management, communication, taxation, and regulation. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - BUSI 1013 Introduction to Business)
  
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    BA 1103 - Business Mathematics


    Credits: 3
    This course is a survey of mathematic fundamentals including a review of decimals and percentages. The topics covered in this course include banking, payroll, markups and markdowns, discounts, interest, consumer math and other related business applications. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    BA 1113 - Introduction to Accounting


    Credits: 3
    This course presents a survey of the basic concepts of accounting for a sole proprietorship as well as other concepts including accounts payable, accounts receivable and the preparation of financial statements. This course is intended for entry-level business students and as preparation for BA 2003 . Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    BA 1213 - Financial Mathematics


    Credits: 3
    This course covers advanced topics in business mathematics calculations. The topics expose the user to concepts such as compound interest, insurance, taxes, corporate stocks and bonds and annuities. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): BA 1103  
  
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    BA 2003 - Accounting Principles I


    Credits: 3
    This course provides a broad overview of the fundamental purposes, theory, and methods of accounting. Emphasis is on the construction and interpretation of accounting statements and their related schedules. BA 1113 , one year of school accounting, or equivalent business experience is recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ACCT 2003 Principles of Accounting I)
  
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    BA 2013 - Accounting Principles II


    Credits: 3
    This course continues with more complex situations in analyzing the use of accounting information and managerial accounting concepts in the planning, appraising, development and analysis of cost information for management’s use in decision making. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): BA 2003   ACTS Department/Number/Title - ACCT 2013 Accounting Principles II
  
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    BA 2033 - Introduction to Finance


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for individuals entering the field of business in accounting, management, or related fields. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments, and corporate finance. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites BA 1103 and BA 1213.
  
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    BA 2043 - Computerized Accounting


    Credits: 3
    The course introduces students to business accounting software. Students use the software applications’ processes and procedures to prepare reports related to the accounting cycle. Accounting concepts are demonstrated in real-world business situations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): BA 1113  or BA 2003  or approval of Department Chair
  
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    BA 2103 - Business Communications


    Credits: 3
    This course teaches principles and mechanics of business writing and application of principles to specific business writing situations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1013  ACTS Department/Number/Title - BUSI 2013 Business Communications 
  
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    BA 2133 - Introduction to Statistics


    Credits: 3
    (Same as MAT 2133 )
    This is a course involving the presentation and interpretation of data, probability, sampling, basic inference, correlation and regression, probability distributions of random continuous variables, and analysis of variance. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): MAT 1223 College Algebra  or MAT 1213 Quantitative Literacy  with a grade of “C” or better OR higher level math.

    ACTS Department/Number/Title - BUSI 2103 Business Statistics

  
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    BA 2143 - Business Information Systems


    Credits: 3
    This course surveys essential information systems and technology fundamentals that are common to most enterprises. Information system components will be explored and applied to managerial functions of generating, deriving, and presenting information through information processing and decision support systems. Integrated examples will demonstrate how business decisions are enabled and empowered by information systems and technology. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103 Introduction to Information Technology  and BA 1003 Introduction to Business  or MM 1203 Principles of Management  
  
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    BA 2313 - Business Administration Internship


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit toward an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Business Administration through supervised on-the-job training in a field directly related to their program of study. Three credit hours will be granted after 120 hours of supervised work experience. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    BA 2713 - Legal Environment of Business


    Credits: 3
    This course studies the legal environment as it applies to business institutions and business activities. A wide range of topics will go from the history of the law to current ethics of the law and the effects of high technology on the legal environment. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - BLAW 2003 Legal Environment of Business)
  
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    BA 2733 - Business and Professional Ethics


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces contemporary ethical issues within the context of business firms and professional organizations. The scope of this course places emphasis on case studies involving ethical dilemmas and conflict management in the workplace. Students examine the dynamics of ethical leadership, focusing on the inherent value of honesty, integrity, morality, and honorable behavior, while developing an awareness of the consequences of unethical conduct in modern society. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    BA 2803 - Business Administration Capstone Project


    Credits: 3
    The Capstone Project is the culmination of the AAS in Business Administration Degree. The course gives students the opportunity to integrate and extend their knowledge of business principles to solve real world business problems. Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in the following courses in order to participate in the Capstone Project course: BA 1113  or higher, BA 2103 , CIS 1333 , ECON 2313  or ECON 2323 , and MM 1303  or permission of department chair. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 1004 - General Biology for Non-Majors


    Credits: 4
    A survey of biology to include an introduction to the fundamental principles of living organisms including properties, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification.  Introductory study of concepts of reproduction, genetics, ecology, and the scientific method are included.  Not appropriate for biology or health science majors. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.  ACTS Department/Number/Title - BIOL 1004 Biology for Non-Majors
  
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    BIOL 1014 - General Biology


    Credits: 4
    A study of the principles of biology.  Provides the foundation for other advanced courses in the biological sciences.  Includes an in-depth study of fundamental biological concepts including the scientific process, classification, structure and functions, cellular metabolism, evolution, and genetics. Appropriate for biology and health science majors, as well as general education. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. ACTS Department/Number/Title - BIOL 1014 General Biology
  
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    BIOL 1144 - Environmental Science


    Credits: 4
    The study of the earth as a habitat.  Interrelationships between humans and the environment. Environmental and geological factors in urban, rural, and regional land use.  This course is composed of a series of lectures and discussions introducing the topics of environmental science including factors related to population, water, soil, wildlife, forest and air quality. It includes the study of man’s interaction with the environment, the energy crisis, and pollution problems including solid waste, noise, pesticides, radiation, and poisonous substances. Lab required. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    BIOL 1304 - General Botany


    Credits: 4
    A scientific study of the principles of botany.  Provides the foundation for other advanced courses in the biological sciences.  Includes an in-depth study of the properties, structure and function, growth, and classifications of plants.  Concepts of plant reproduction, photosynthesis, ecology, and genetics are included. Appropriate for biology majors. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. ACTS/Department/Title/Number BIOL 1024 Botany for Non Majors
  
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    BIOL 1434 - Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology


    Credits: 4
    This course studies the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology of the human body with emphasis on body structure, functions of each body system, and basic chemistry. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    BIOL 1504 - General Zoology


    Credits: 4
    Introduction to zoological principles relating to cells, organ systems, development, genetics, ecology, evolution, and animal phyla. Course designed for biology majors, but may also be taken for general education. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1004 with a C or higher OR BIOL 1014 with a C or higher. ACTS/Department/Title/Number BIOL 1054 General Zoology
  
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    BIOL 2014 - Microbiology


    Credits: 4
    Introductory course in microbiology. Includes microbiological concepts including the study of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa as they affect the human body. Designed for majors in health professions programs. In the laboratory, emphasis is on identification and handling of microorganisms. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): A “C” or better in any college-level biology course OR a “C” or better in CHEM 1214  or CHEM 1415 . (ACTS Department/Number/Title - BIOL 2004 Introductory Microbiology)
  
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    BIOL 2214 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    Credits: 4
    A two-semester study of the structure and functions of the organ systems of the human body and how they work together to maintain homeostasis. This study introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body with emphasis on body structure and function. Topics covered will include chemical, cellular, and tissue level of organization; integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): A “C” or better in BIOL 1014 General Biology  BIOL 1434 Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology CHEM 1214 Fundamentals of Chemistry  or CHEM 1415 College Chemistry I   (ACTS Department/Number/Title - BIOL 2404 Human Anatomy and Physiology I)
  
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    BIOL 2224 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    Credits: 4
    This course studies in detail the anatomy and physiology of the human body with emphasis on body function. Topics covered will be the special senses; endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems; metabolism; fluid-electrolyte and acid-base balance; and genetics. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): A “C” or better in BIOL 2214 . (ACTS Department/Number/Title - BIOL 2414 Human Anatomy and Physiology II)

Computer Aided Design

  
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    TECH 1203 - Introduction to Computer Aided Design


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to modern CAD software used to create technical drawings of complex parts and assemblies. Design process, technical sketching, drawing, measurement and statistics, modeling skills, geometric design and reverse engineering techniques are elements covered throughout this course. This course utilizes both 2-D and 3-D CAD software commonly used in construction and manufacturing applications. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    TECH 1233 - Engineering Graphics


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces design fundamentals, including orthographic and isometric projections, sections, auxiliary views, accepted dimensioning practices, and rapid sketching techniques. It also includes a survey of various industrial shop-floor and in-filed sketching practices required for quick change design requirements in today’s competitive manufacturing environment. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Construction Equipment Operation

  
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    CEO 1103 - Construction Equipment Safety


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to basic safety information and procedures relative to the operation of heavy equipment. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CEO 1109 - Basic Operating Principles


    Credits: 9
    The course presents students information relative to the basic operating principles of heavy equipment. Skills include starting and stopping, using clutches, brakes and power controls, basic operating, inspecting equipment, and using the operator’s manual. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 18 hours per week. Corequisite(s): CEO 1103   Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021  
  
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    CEO 1201 - Soil Types and Characteristics


    Credits: 1
    This course acquaints the student with practical procedures for dealing with problems presented when moving different types of soils. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 1 hour per week.
  
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    CEO 1301 - Survey and Measurement


    Credits: 1
    This course includes reading and understanding levels, adjusting instruments, and identifying and reading grade stakes for removing earth. In addition, information concerning measurement and container capacity and land measurement will be covered. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 1 hour per week.
  
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    CEO 1501 - Landscaping and Agriculture Grading


    Credits: 1
    This course includes procedures for land leveling, fills for structures, drainage and diversion ditches, construction of farm ponds, and terracing. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 1 hour per week.
  
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    CEO 1506 - Construction Equipment Operation I


    Credits: 6
    This course involves practical application of the procedures taught in CEO 1201 , CEO 1301 , and CEO 1501 . The basic operating procedures practiced will be refined in this lab. Safety is emphasized. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 12 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CEO 1109  
  
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    CEO 1606 - Construction Equipment Operation II


    Credits: 6
    In this course, the student begins to work independently as expected of a heavy equipment operator. The basic operating procedures are used for more finished work and grades. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 12 hours per week.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 1214 - Fundamentals of Chemistry


    Credits: 4
    This is a survey course appropriate for majors in health-related professions and general education (non-science) majors. The course content provides a foundation for work in health related areas. It includes nomenclature, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, and reactions. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.  ACTS/Department/Title/Number CHEM 1214 Health -Related Professions
  
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    CHEM 1224 - Chemistry II for Health-Related Professions


    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of CHEM 1214  designed for majors in health-related professions. This is an introductory course in organic chemistry and biochemistry, with emphasis on the chemistry of human physiology. This course will be offered only on demand. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): A “C” or better in CHEM 1214  or CHEM 1415 . (ACTS Department/Number/Title - CHEM 1224 Chemistry II for Health-Related Professions)
  
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    CHEM 1415 - College Chemistry I


    Credits: 5
    This algebra-based chemistry course is applicable for chemistry and other science majors and preprofessional students. This is the first course of a two-course sequence. The course content provides a foundation for work in advanced chemistry and related sciences and includes in-depth study of nomenclature, atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, bonding, and reactions. Lecture 4 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week.  ACTS/Department/Title/Number CHEM 1414 College Chemistry I for Science Majors
  
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    CHEM 1425 - College Chemistry II


    Credits: 5
    This course is a continuation of CHEM 1415. Designed for chemistry and other science majors, and pre-professional students.  Includes more in-depth study of chemical reactions with laboratory emphasis on introductory qualitative analysis.  Lab required. Lecture 4 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): A “C” or better in CHEM 1415 College Chemistry I   AND a “C” or better in MAT 1223 College Algebra   or higher (ACTS Department/Number/Title - CHEM 1424 College Chemistry II for Science Majors)

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 1103 - Introduction to Information Technology


    Credits: 3
    Introduction to IT provides a working vocabulary of terms used by computer personnel and an introduction to the latest version of Microsoft Office, an integrated software package that encompasses database management, presentation graphics, spreadsheet, and word processing applications. In addition to providing marketable skills, mastery of this course will enhance students’ efficiency and effectiveness. This course also provides an opportunity to use the Internet and email as learning tools and emphasizes proper file management. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - CPSI 1003 Introduction to Computers)
  
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    CIS 1113 - Introduction to Digital Media


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to concepts, terminology, and design theory central to the field of digital media. Students will receive an orientation to the software applications and lab facilities available for their use. Career opportunities within the field will be studied with an emphasis on creative problem solving and the importance of meeting deadlines. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CIS 1253 - Word Processing I


    Credits: 3
    Emphasis in this course is placed on basic word processing skills such as storing, retrieving, formatting, editing, and printing.  This course introduces terminology and required production of documents for business and personal use.  Keyboarding competency is expected with students being able to key a minimum of 40 wpm.  Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  or permission of the instructor
  
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    CIS 1333 - Spreadsheet I


    Credits: 3
    Spreadsheet I introduces spreadsheet functions and applications. Students will learn how to design, create, manipulate, calculate, and present data. Students will utilize critical thinking skills and apply spreadsheet techniques in developing information for business applications. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103 and BA 1103
  
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    CIS 1343 - Spreadsheet II


    Credits: 3
    This is a continuation of Spreadsheet I and is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of formatting techniques, spreadsheet functions, analysis tools, and management techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1333
  
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    CIS 1513 - Introduction to Programming in SAS


    Credits: 3
    Introduces the SAS frameworks and the rich set of tools and technologies for developing stand-alone and web applications.  Topics include DATA step, Macro, Functions and SAS Procedures and introduces ODS and Base reporting. Lecture 3 hours per week Pre/Co-requisites  MAT 2133 Introduction to Statistics /BA 2133 Introduction to Statistics  
  
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    CIS 1603 - Introduction to Programming


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces techniques of fundamental programming using a modern and relevant programming language.  This course is an introduction to best practices of effective software design and development, along with practical exercises to re-enforce lecture topics. Topics include sequential processing, selection, and iterative control structures, functions, parameter passing, file processing, and an introduction to one-dimensional arrays, string processing, classes and records. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CIS 1643 - VBA Programming


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications programming language and the rich set of tools and technologies to extend the benefits of the Microsoft Office suite of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Prerequisites CIS 1103 and CIS 1603 or permission of instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CIS 1663 - Intermediate Programming


    Credits: 3
    This course builds upon the concepts covered in Introduction to Programming.  Topics include multi-dimensional arrays, exception handling, string processing, classes, and records.  Primary emphasis of this course will be on event-driven, object-oriented development using a modern and relevant programming language. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1603 Introduction to Programming   with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor. 
  
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    CIS 2003 - Mobile Application Development


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces application development in the context of a mobile computing environment.  Students will create and deploy applications usable by modern smart phone and tablets.  The obstacles of mobile development and deployment techniques will be presented. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1663 Intermediate Programming   or permission of instructor. 
  
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    CIS 2013 - Programming in R


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces statistical computing programming in R.  Topics include input/output with the R language, accessing packages and writing functions in R.  Students will perform practical statistical data analysis and solution development to support the topics introduced in the classroom. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103 Introduction to Information Technology  
 

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