Jan 18, 2021  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions


At North Arkansas College all courses carry identifying department prefixes and numbers that designate the level of the course, whether it is a part of a sequence or a one-semester course.

The numbering system aids students in planning programs. The digits in a course number also indicate the level of the course and whether it will carry college credit. Explanation of that system is as follows:

Digits from Level/Credit Explanation
0001-0999 College Preparatory classes that do not count toward associate degree requirements nor are they intended for transfer.
1000-1999 Freshmen level courses designed for the associate degree at North Arkansas College or for transfer to other institutions of higher education.
2000-2899 Advanced or sophomore level courses required in the associate degree program at North Arkansas College or for transfer to institutions of higher education.
2900-2999 Special project courses, which may carry 1-5 hours credit which may or may not transfer to other institutions.

The college reserves the right to cancel courses each semester for which adequate enrollment cannot be maintained.

The last digit of each four-digit number indicates the number of credit hours for the course.

Courses are alphabetized according to their prefix, not department.

In order for pre-requisite courses to be considered complete, a “C” or better must be obtained.

 

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 2043 - Cloud Application Development


    Credits: 3
    This course examines and introduces cloud architecture, application development, and the technologies used to create and deliver them.  Students will also learn cloud application development, design, and implementation of cloud solutions using existing cloud development tools. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1663 Intermediate Programming   or permission of the instructor. 
  
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    CIS 2203 - Data Structures and Algorithm Design


    Credits: 3
    This course involves a study of algorithms analysis and design using abstract data structures and the implementation of these concepts.  Topics include recursion, stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees and graphs.
  
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    CIS 2243 - Desktop Publishing (Adobe InDesign)


    Credits: 3
    This course teaches basic desktop publishing skills using the software Adobe InDesign. InDesign is a comprehensive program that allows the user to create output-ready layouts that interface seamlessly with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Students learn not only the skills needed in desktop publishing but also the basics of publishing and graphic design. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  
  
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    CIS 2253 - Video Editing


    Credits: 3
    An introduction to video development, pre-production, production, and post-production. Combining the presentation of theory, aesthetics, and methods with a hands-on practical experience using industry standard equipment and software. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103 Introduction to Information Technology  
  
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    CIS 2303 - Computer Illustration


    Credits: 3
    This course focuses on learning to use Adobe Illustrator, the leading industry standard for professional illustration. Students will use Illustrator to create projects from simple graphics, icons, and text to complex and multilayered illustrations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  
  
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    CIS 2313 - Digital Media Internship


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit toward an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Information Technology through supervised on-the-job training in a field directly related to their program of study. Three credit hours will be granted based on 120 hours of supervised work experience. Arrangements with employers offering internship opportunities will be documented using a North Arkansas College Cooperative Internship form. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1113 , CIS 2303 , CIS 2713 , CIS 2863 , CIS 2243 , MM 2543 , and CIS 2833  
  
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    CIS 2323 - Social Media Marketing


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the strategic use of social media platforms and their use in media and business environments. Students will examine the diverse channels available to communication professionals and demonstrate their effective use. Diverse social media platforms will be analyzed for how they are best used as news sources, branding platforms, and engines of business growth. The course will also focus on content creation, how to increase ROI in social media, social analytics and community management. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CIS 2353 - Word Processing II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of Word Processing I. Emphasis is placed on more in-depth application of word processing skills including designing, formatting, and editing techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1253  
  
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    CIS 2423 - Database Management


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces terminology and application of current database management software in the production of relational databases. Course content will include file management with a study of Microsoft Access, including the uses of tables, queries, forms, and reports. This course introduces the fundamentals of database design, analysis, and management. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    CIS 2643 - Visual Programming


    Credits: 3
    Introduces the Microsoft .NET framework and the rich set of tools and technologies for developing stand-alone, web and networking applications. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1663 Intermediate Programming  or permission of the instructor
  
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    CIS 2713 - Web Design I


    Credits: 3
    This course covers the basics of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) used to code web pages. It introduces Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for managing web page layout and formatting. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  or permission of the instructor
  
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    CIS 2733 - Front End Development


    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the foundational skills needed to build and implement front end applications.  Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of scripting languages, frameworks, cross browser development, version control and content management systems.  Students will develop applicable applications to support the topics covered in class.  Prerequisite(s): CIS 1603  or permission of the instructor
  
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    CIS 2833 - Web Design II


    Credits: 3
    This course guides students in developing dynamic web pages and websites using multimedia files, e-commerce basics, web promotion techniques, and scripting languages such as JavaScript and jQuery. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CIS 2713 Web Design I  
  
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    CIS 2863 - Image Editing (Adobe Photoshop)


    Credits: 3
    This course teaches the basic elements of image editing using Adobe Photoshop, a software application creating original art, retouching or modifying existing art, and composition with multiple images. It is the tool of choice for graphic professionals, but is also a useful tool for anyone who is interested in enhancing digital photos. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  

Computer Information Technology

  
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    CIT 1003 - Networking Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the concepts, components, and models of computer networks. It uses the OSI model and TCP/IP models to examine the roles of protocols and services at the each layer of the models. Students will also learn the principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week.  Pre/Co-requisites CIS 1103  
  
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    CIT 1013 - Cloud Technologies Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces concepts and methodologies used to implement and maintain cloud technologies, and provides knowledge and best practices for use in cloud computing environments.  Topics include basic networking, virtualization, storage, security, resource management and business continuity models.  By the end of this course, students will understand cloud technologies and know how to implement cloud computing in various environments. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  
  
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    CIT 1103 - Introduction to Networks


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI model and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. At the end of the course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of network devices, and implementing IP addressing schemes. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites CIS 1103  
  
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    CIT 1113 - Switching, Routing, and Wireless Essentials


    Credits: 3
    This course describes the architecture, components, and operation of routers, switches and wireless devices. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot routing and switching protocols, basic LAN security and Wireless LAN systems. By the end of the course, students will have experience, through the use of labs and classroom instruction, with many of the networking components and concepts that comprise most of today’s networks. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIT 1103  
  
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    CIT 1123 - Survey of Operating Systems


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of popular operating systems in use by IT professionals.  Students will learn the differences between Windows, UNIX/Linux, and MacOS operating systems and how to install and update each.  Students will also learn the functions and features of popular CPU’s used in modern computers. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Pre/Co-requisites CIS 1103  
  
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    CIT 1133 - Server Administration


    Credits: 3
    This course builds on the concepts in CIT 1123   and focuses on the administration of networking and identity services in the Windows Server environment.  Students will configure and learn best practices, functions and concepts of services such as DHCP, DNS, Active Directory, and Group Policy. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 1123  
  
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    CIT 1143 - IT Essentials


    Credits: 3
    This course covers microprocessor systems technology with an emphasis on standard PC computer systems. Topics include standard PC architecture, troubleshooting PC hardware and software, peripheral interfacing, printers, mobile devices, basic networking, operating systems, security, help desk techniques, and recent developments in the computer industry. Coursework includes the Cisco Information Technology Essentials I curriculum. This course prepares students for the CompTIA A+ certification exams.  Lecture 2 hours and lab 2 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites CIS 1103   or higher CIS/CIT computer course or permission of the instructor. 
  
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    CIT 1213 - Wireless and Cellular Networking


    Credits: 3
    This course involves a study of algorithms analysis and design using abstract data structures and the implementation of these concepts.  Topics include recursion, stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees and graphs. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites

    CIT 1103   or permission of instructor

  
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    CIT 1253 - Cybersecurity Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of network security principles and implementation. Topics include the types and methods of attacks, security topologies, intrusion detection systems, firewalls, physical security, security policies, and basic computer forensics. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103   
  
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    CIT 1303 - Firewall Fundamentals


    This course explores the function, features and implementation of firewall technologies in an enterprise environment. Students will develop skills to install and configure firewall services and hardware for defense of an enterprise network. Students will learn the basics of threat prevention, logging, and reporting features of next generation firewall systems and develop strategies to cope with current cybersecurity threats. Lecture 3 hours week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 1003 
  
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    CIT 2003 - CIT Internship


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit toward that AAS in Information Technology, Network/Systems Administration Emphasis through supervised on-the-job training in a field directly related to their program of study. Three credit hours will be granted after 120 hours of supervised work experience. Arrangements with employers offering internship opportunities will be documented using a North Arkansas College Cooperative Internship form. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites Enrollment in the AAS in IT, Network/Systems Administration
  
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    CIT 2113 - Linux Operating Systems


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the UNIX/Linux operating system. Topics include installation, structure, operating system commands, graphical user interfaces, administration tools and techniques, and implementation of common networking services. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites CIT 1123   
  
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    CIT 2123 - Virtualization Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces concepts relating to the technologies of virtualization.  Students will explore the uses, history, implementation, configuration and deployment of virtualized servers and appliances.  Students will also gain experience in managing CPU’s, memory, storage and peripherals and how to apply security principles in a virtualized environment. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 1003  
  
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    CIT 2203 - Enterprise Networking, Security and Automation


    Credits: 3
    This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies needed to design and implement a complete network - from LAN to WAN. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer along with routing protocols such as OSPF.  Students will also learn networking concepts such as VPN, IPsec, virtualization and automation. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIT 1113
  
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    CIT 2303 - Digital Forensics


    Credits: 3
    This course explores the introduction of digital forensics from a Cybersecurity perspective.  The course will utilize a variety of applications and tools to inspect and preserve files and documents and make secure copies.  Students will explore security techniques such as log file inspection, file access and permission levels within the file structure. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 2403  
  
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    CIT 2313 - Ethical Hacking


    Credits: 3
    This course prepares students to understand the process of hacking in an ethical and controlled environment.  Students will learn skills that can be used by Cybersecurity professionals to perform secure penetration testing and other means to evaluate a network or system’s vulnerabilities and how to secure them against threats. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 2403  
  
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    CIT 2323 - Advanced Digital Forensics


    Credits: 3
    This course builds on the techniques introduced in CIT 2303   and introduces advanced fundamentals of incident response and digital forensics. Topics include more in-depth discussions of historical and modern operating systems, a systematic approach to incident response using multi-step processes, preservation of data, data recovery forensics analysis, and legal aspects of both investigation and preservation.  Students will perform multiple hands on labs with modern digital forensic tools to reinforce the concepts presented in the class. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIT 2303  
  
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    CIT 2403 - Advanced Network Security


    Credits: 3
    This course builds on the security principles learned in CIT 1253   and prepares students on the techniques used by organizations to manage cyber threats.  Students will learn how to identify security vulnerabilities and how to effectively manage them.  Students will also learn how to respond to security threats through incident response practices and forensic analysis while developing skills with common toolsets.Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 1253  
  
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    CIT 2413 - Network Technology Capstone


    Credits: 3
    This is the capstone course for the students in the Network/Systems Administration Emphasis of the Information Technology AAS degree. Topics include network and IT infrastructure design and implementation, case studies of existing networks, hands-on implementation of a simulated network and IT infrastructure and the project design and management skills necessary to complete a project. Emphasis will be on real-world implementations, security and the design process. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIT 2203  or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): CIT 2213  or CIT 2403  
  
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    CIT 2423 - Advanced Technologies


    Credits: 3
    In this hands-on course, students will be exposed to many different types of technologies such as NAS devices, VoIP, WiFi, Media Servers, consumer IoT devices, Raspberry PI devices and open source integration apps.  Students will gain skills in the design, selection, installation and configuration of these technologies. Lecture 2 hours and lab 2 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): CIT 1003  or CIT 1103  

College Preparatory

  
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    CP 0113 - Keyboarding Essentials


    Credits: 3
    Keyboarding Essentials is designed for the beginning typing student or a student who needs to improve their skill and accuracy. The course emphasizes touch control of the keyboard, proper keying techniques, speed and accuracy skills, and the formatting of basic business documents using word processing functions. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week.
  
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    CP 0213 - Quantitative Literacy Enhancement


    Credits: 3
    This course assists students who need additional math and algebra experience when enrolling in MAT 1213 . The course content focuses on supplementary math and algebraic skills to facilitate student success in MAT 1213 . Enrollment in the course is required based on placement testing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CP 0923  or CP 0933   or MAT 1013   or TECH 1013   with a “C” or better. Corequisite(s): MAT 1213  
  
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    CP 0223 - College Algebra Enhancement


    Credits: 3
    This course assists students who need additional algebra experience when enrolling in MAT 1223 . The course content focuses on supplementary algebraic skills to facilitate student success in MAT 1223 . Enrollment in the course is required based on placement testing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite(s): MAT 1223  
  
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    CP 0232 - Science Enhancement


    Credits: 2
    This course assists students who need additional reading, study skills, note taking, and research experience when enrolling in certain science courses.  The tools being developed in this course are specific to science courses. See Placement Guide for placement score prerequisites.  Prerequisite(s): CP 0816   with a C or better. Corequisite(s): BIOL 1004 BIOL 1014 , BIOL 1144 BIOL 1304 , BIOL 1434 BIOL 1504 CHEM 1214 GEOL 1014 PHSC 1004 , PHSC 1044 PHSC 1104  
  
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    CP 0816 - Introduction to Language


    Credits: 6
    This course is designed to help students who need additional composition and reading experience before enrolling in ENGL 1013 . The course content focuses on the integration of reading and writing, providing the essential grammar principles and reading techniques for effective college writing. Enrollment in the course is required based on placement testing. See Placement Chart. Lecture 6 hours per week.
  
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    CP 0913 - Fundamentals of Language


    Credits: 3
    This course assists students who need additional composition and reading experience when enrolling in ENGL 1013 . The course content focuses on supplementary reading and writing to facilitate student success in ENGL 1013 . It also teaches the essential grammar principles and reading techniques for effective college writing. Enrollment in the course is required based on placement testing. See Placement Chart. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite(s): ENGL 1013  
  
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    CP 0923 - Foundations of Math


    Credits: 3
    This course surveys a variety of mathematical topics needed to prepare students for college level quantitative literacy or for algebra-based courses. Topics include: numeracy with an emphasis on estimation and fluency with large numbers; evaluating expressions and formulas; rates, ratios, and proportions; percentages; solving equations; linear models; data interpretations including graphs and tables; verbal, algebraic and graphical representations of functions; exponential models. This course carries institutional credit but will not transfer and will not be used to meet degree requirements. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CP 0933 - Foundations of Algebra


    Credits: 3
    This course is a developmental course to prepare students for College Algebra. It covers factoring; exponential, radical, and rational expressions; quadratic, radical, and rational equations; further study of functions and graphs, including quadratic and other basic functions; and interwoven relevant problem solving. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Collision Repair Technology

  
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    CRT 1005 - Structural Analysis and Damage Repair


    Credits: 5
    Instruction includes methods of manual frame measuring equipment used in unitized and conventional frame repair and methods of analyzing damage. Instruction is given in the use of frame equipment, frame and body construction, and straightening. The use of computer laser body alignment systems is taught. Unibody sectioning procedures and safety are also presented. This course is accredited by the ASE Education Foundation. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 7 hours per week.
  
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    CRT 1015 - Non-Structural Analysis and Damage Repair


    Credits: 5
    This course provides the basics in auto collision repair, personal safety, shop safety, use of hand tools, power tools and equipment, use and handling of repair materials, diagnosis and classification of damage, physical characteristics of metal and repair of damaged sheet metal. This course is accredited by the ASE Education Foundation. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 7 hours per week.
  
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    CRT 1025 - Automotive Painting and Refinishing


    Credits: 5
    This course teaches students how to properly use safety and refinish equipment, understand and apply the proper undercoat system, determine areas to be refinished, as well as methods of sanding and applying automotive paint. Students will learn about blending paint along with removing minor imperfections. The theory and practice involved in the application of tri-coat paint systems, color tinting and plastic refinishing is also covered. This course is accredited by the ASE Education Foundation. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 7 hours per week.
  
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    CRT 1035 - Mechanical and Electrical


    Credits: 5
    This course provides instruction for diagnosing and servicing of driver’s side and passenger’s side air bags restraint systems and components. Instruction in removing and protecting open lines and wiring, removal and replacement of stationary glass, electrical wiring, removal and replacement of engine and suspension components. This course is accredited by the ASE Education Foundation. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 7 hours per week.
  
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    CRT 2605 - Collision Repair III


    Credits: 5
    This course includes the removal and replacement of auto body parts, glass, trim, and electrical wiring. Emphasis is given to computerized estimation of damages and wrecked automobile rebuilding. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 9 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CRT 1005, CRT 1015, CRT 1025 and CRT 1035.

Construction Technology

  
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    CT 1000 - CT Internship


    Credits: 1-3
    This course provides an opportunity for students to earn credit toward the Construction Technology certificate of proficiency (CP), Technical Certificate (TC) and the Associate of Applied Science General Technology degree. Arrangements with employers offering internship opportunities will be documented using a North Arkansas College Cooperative Internship form. This is a variable credit course which can be taken for 1-3 credit hours and may be repeated for credit up to three times for a maximum of 3 credit hours. One to three credit hours will be granted after 40-120 clock hours of supervised work experience. Pre/Co-requisites CP, TC or AAS General Technology Program and permission of the instructor.
  
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    CT 1003 - Blueprint Reading and Estimating


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to basic construction drawings and specifications. Course content will cover architectural symbols, scales and dimensioning, construction terminology, project estimating and required materials from various construction drawings. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    CT 1223 - Construction Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to the construction trade and includes basic job-site safety, Building Materials, Fasteners & Adhesives, Hand and power tools, Construction Drawings and Layout and Floor framing systems. Students will complete the first half of the NCCER Carpentry Level 1 curriculum during this course. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021 Industrial Safety  
  
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    CT 1233 - Construction Methods


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of CT 1223 and covers wall systems, ceiling and roof framing, Building Envelope Systems and Basic Stair Layout.  Students will complete the second half of the NCCER Carpentry Level 1 Curriculum in this course. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021 Industrial Safety  
  
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    CT 1303 - Commercial and Residential Plumbing


    Credits: 3
    This course covers theory, design, planning, and installation of modern commercial and residential plumbing systems and introduces National Building Code requirements for plumbing and drainage systems. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week.
  
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    CT 1323 - Construction: Exterior Finishing


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of the NCCER Carpentry curriculum. Students will be introduced to Commercial drawings, Steel Framing, Exterior Finishing Techniques, Thermal & Moisture Protection and Roofing Applications. Students will complete the first half of the NCCER Carpentry Level 2 curriculum during this course. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021  
  
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    CT 1333 - Construction: Interior Finishing


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of CT 1323 ,with emphasis on Door & Window installation, drywall and finishing, suspended ceilings, interior trim and cabinet installation. Students will complete the second half of the NCCER Carpentry Level 2 curriculum in this course. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week.
  
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    CT 1803 - Modern Cabinet Making


    Credits: 3
    This course covers construction, finishing, installation and trimming of modern cabinets. Course content includes material selection, estimating, layout and fabrication, various finishes, hardware and trim selection and professional installation techniques. Both wall mounted and free standing cabinetry are covered in this course. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): TECH 1021  
  
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    CT 2403 - Electrical Wiring


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to safety rules, regulations, and electrical hazards on the job; including the OSHA-mandated lockout/tagout procedure. This course also covers electrical devices and wiring techniques common to residential construction and maintenance while covering appropriate NEC requirements. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites TECH 1021 Industrial Safety  

Data Science

  
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    DVSC 1003 - Introduction to Data Science


    Credits: 3
    Introduction to Data Science (DVSC 1003) is a course providing an overview and introduction to the essential elements of data science, including data collection and management; summarizing and visualizing data; basic ideas of statistical inference; predictive analytics and machine learning. Students will gain hands-on experience using the specified programming language and web application.   
  
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    DVSC 1104 - Programming Languages for Data Science


    Credits: 4
    Programming Languages for Data Science provides a semester-long introduction to basic concepts, tools, and languages for computer programming used by data scientists. This class will introduce students to computer programming and provide them with the basic skills and tools necessary to efficiently collect, process, analyze, and visualize datasets. Students will gain hands-on experience with de novo programming, finding and utilizing packages, and working in both interactive and non-interactive environments. 
  
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    DVSC 2113 - Pinrciples and Techniques in Data Science


    Credits: 3
    This class is an intermediate semester-long data science course that follows an overview of data science in today’s world.  This class bridges between introduction to data science and upper division data science courses as well as methods courses in other concentrations.  This class equips students with essential basic elements of data science, ranging from database systems, data acquisition, storage and query, data cleansing, data wrangling, basic data summarization and visualization, and data estimation and modeling management.
  
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    DVSC 2203 - Data Mangement and Date Base


    Credits: 3
    Data Management & Data Base focuses on the investigation and application of data science database concepts including DBMS fundamentals, database technology and administration, data modeling, SQL, data warehousing, and current topics in modern database management.
  
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    DVSC 2213 - Data Visualization and Communication


    Credits: 3
    Data Visualization and Communication (DVSC 2213) is a seminar providing an essential element of data science: the ability to effectively communicate data analytics findings using visual, written, and oral forms. Students will gain hands-on experience using data visualization software and preparing multiple formats of written reports (technical, social media, policy) that build a data literacy and communication toolkit for interdisciplinary work. In essence, this is a course emphasizing finding and telling stories from data, including the fundamental principles of data analysis and visual presentation conjoined with traditional written formats. 

Drama

  
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    DRAM 1003 - Theatre Appreciation


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introductory survey to concepts in theatre arts. Students are introduced to stagecraft, design, and performance. The course covers an overview of acting styles, history, and genres in lecture and open discussion. Students attend live performances and participate in forum discussion and written response regarding the experience. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - DRAM 1003 Theatre Appreciation)
  
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    DRAM 1103 - Beginning Acting I


    Credits: 3
    This course offers fundamental training in acting. Topics include the roles of the actor and director, theories of casting and acting, steps in rehearsing, interpretation of roles with practical application of the principles learned through improvisation and scenes from plays. Complete productions are offered to the student body and the public each term. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    DRAM 1113 - Beginning Acting II


    Credits: 3
    This course offers fundamental training in acting. Students enrolled in this course will not only participate in developing dramatic roles for live performance but in addition undertake studies in acting styles, methods and various theories of acting and directing, steps in rehearsing, interpretation of roles with practical application of the principles learned through improvisation. Beginning Acting II students will also prepare oral presentations of various theatre artists. Complete productions are offered to the student body and the public each term. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): DRAM 1103  
  
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    DRAM 1123 - Drama in Healthcare Simulation


    Credits: 3
    This course offers fundamental training in acting. Topics include the roles of the actor and director, theories of casting and acting, steps in rehearsing, interpretation of roles with practical application of the principles learned through improvisation and scenarios in healthcare simulations. Students will engage and perform controlled sessions where theater and drama based activities are utilized to observe and explore the behavior, attitudes and emotions of individuals experiencing physical, mental and emotional health disparities. A majority of the lab activities will be conducted in Northark’s Health Education Simulation Center in collaboration with healthcare profession students. Two Lecture hours and three Laboratory hours per week.
  
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    DRAM 1203 - Introduction to Technical Theatre I Studio/Non-Studio


    Credits: 3
    This is a practical course in creative stage set design and construction, including instruction in the areas of public relations, light control, costume design, makeup, and other areas of play production. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week.
  
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    DRAM 1213 - Introduction to Technical Theatre II


    Credits: 3
    This class offers the sophomore level of Theatre Production for the transfer student in Fine and Performing Arts; course content is a continuation of Drama 1203. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): DRAM 1203  
  
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    DRAM 2203 - Advanced Acting


    Credits: 3
    The Advanced Acting class is for students who have successfully completed Acting I and II and demonstrate the qualities which define the professional attitude required in order to study acting on the advanced level. Evaluation is performance based, but is dependent on completion of all assignments. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    DRAM 2213 - Improvisation for Theatre


    This course is for students who desire to improve their spontaneity, creativity, and characterization skills. Students will learn the basics of improv as well as how the art form relates to other forms of theatre such as traditional acting, stand-up, sketch, etc. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): DRAM 1103 Beginning Acting I  or instructor permission.

Economics

  
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    ECON 2313 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of macroeconomics within the framework of the American capitalist system. It focuses on the aggregate behavior of the economy. Specific topics include the market system, consumption, investment, government revenue and expenditures, national income, the business cycle, inflation, unemployment aggregate demand, aggregate supply, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and the banking system. It emphasizes class discussion of contemporary economic issues and the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ECON 2103 Principles of Macroeconomics)
  
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    ECON 2323 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Credits: 3
    This introduces the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and focuses on economic decisions made by individuals, specifically consumers and producers. Specific topics include demand and supply, elasticity, consumer behavior, utility, costs of productions, types of competition, antitrust regulation, labor markets, distribution of income, and international trade. Emphasis is on the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills within various economic scenarios. Lecture 3 hours per week. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ECON 2203 Principles of Microeconomics)

Education

  
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    EDUC 1213 - Education Profession


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the education profession. Topics include school organization, educator roles, school curriculum, teacher characteristics, contemporary issues, careers in education, legal and ethical concerns, and the certification and admission process. Thirty hours of observations in a school are required. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    EDUC 2013 - Child Growth and Development


    Credits: 3
    This course studies environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor, and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing children from conception to adolescence. It introduces students to (1) learning theories applied to developmental stages, (2) ways to observe and evaluate children’s development, (3) recognition of possible delays in development, (4) practical application of theory through a variety of hands-on experiences and observations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1213  
  
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    EDUC 2023 - The Exceptional Child


    Credits: 3
    The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to the unique characteristics, abilities, and challenges associated with diverse learners. The history and treatment of persons with disabilities, legal foundations of special education, evaluation process, special education language and service delivery models will be emphasized. This course requires teacher candidates to reflect on professional role expectations, responsibilities, and obligations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre/Co-requisites EDUC 1213  
  
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    EDUC 2213 - Educational Technology


    Credits: 3
    Educational Technology introduces the prospective teacher to the applications of technology in education. Students use computer-based technologies and traditional media to explore teaching methods, create instructional materials, locate outside sources of information, and establish links of professional communication. Knowledge is applied through one hour per week lecture and two hours per week working on projects. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 1103  or permission of the instructor

Emergency Medical Sciences

  
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    EMS 1022 - Emergency Medical Responder


    Credits: 2
    This course provides training in emergency medical care for those who are apt to be the first persons responding to an accident. The course emphasizes development of skills in patient assessment and emergency medical care procedures. The course is especially useful to policemen, firemen, school bus drivers, and other public service personnel. Lecture 2 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1102 - Emergency Medical Technology Practicum


    Credits: 2
    The EMT-Practicum course introduces basic skills necessary for EMTs to function in the emergency room and pre-hospital environments. Lab 6 hours per week. Corequisite(s): EMS 1105
  
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    EMS 1103 - Preparatory


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to advanced pre-hospital. Topics include the well being of the paramedic, medical ethics, professionalism, responsibilities, EMS systems, medical/legal considerations, therapeutic communications, life span development, stress management, pharmacology review, and airway management and ventilation. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): EMS 1105  and 1102.
  
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    EMS 1105 - Emergency Medical Technology


    Credits: 5
    The EMT course is an introductory study of the existing medical emergency services and the basic principles, procedures, and techniques of emergency care. The course follows the national Standard Curriculum Guidelines as set forth by the Department of Transportation. Upon successful completion of this course, the EMT candidate will meet the requirements to challenge the Arkansas EMT certification exam. Lecture 5 hours per week. Corequisite(s): EMS 1102 
  
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    EMS 1303 - Patient Assessment


    Credits: 3
    This course addresses the needs of the patient, the skills and knowledge necessary to meet them, and priorities for the accomplishment of each need. The history of patient assessment is covered along with special challenges the paramedic may face in the field. Physical exam techniques are discussed with attention to each anatomical region. Other topics include patient assessment in the field; scene appraisal, initial assessment, focused history and physical exam; detailed physical exam; and ongoing assessment. Clinical decision-making and documentation will complete this area of study. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1314 - Medical Emergencies I


    Credits: 4
    This course discusses the respiratory anatomy and physiology, normal respiratory function and mechanics of respiration, and introduction to the use of cardiac monitoring. It also emphasizes the respiratory system assessment, pathophysiology of respiratory distress, and evaluation and management of respiratory distress due to medical and trauma related problems. Care of patients with cardiac disorders includes etiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, cardiac disease processes, and ACLS. This course prepares the EMT-P to assess and manage those cardiac emergencies that result from coronary atherosclerosis, along with a number of conditions involving pathology of the peripheral circulation. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of cardiac dysrhythmias taught earlier. Treatment of the patient’s clinical signs and symptoms is stressed. Lecture 4 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1325 - Medical Emergencies II


    Credits: 5
    This course covers recognition, management, and pathophysiology of patients with medical emergencies. This course covers all medical emergencies excluding cardiac and respiratory. Topics are neurology, endocrinology, allergies and anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, urology and nephrology, toxicology and substance abuse, hematology, environmental emergencies, infectious disease, gynecological problems, obstetrical emergencies, and psychiatric emergencies. Problem solving, treatment, and recognition of each medical condition are emphasized. Lecture 5 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1354 - Trauma Management


    Credits: 4
    This course covers the management and treatment of traumatic injuries involving soft tissues, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal structures. It includes materials based upon, and is compatible with, the material contained in the Advanced Trauma Life Support of the American College of Surgeons and their pre-hospital protocol document, and the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support Program by the National Association of EMT’s. Shock or lack of cellular oxygen, its significance, and its management are covered in depth. The class covers body fluids, osmosis, and pathophysiology of shock, evaluation, and resuscitation. The current pre-hospital treatment of shock and trauma-related injuries is covered. Lecture 4 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1423 - Special Considerations


    Credits: 3
    This course explores challenging EMS situations that provide the paramedic with the greatest difficulty in the field. These range from neonatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, emergencies, abuse and assault, the challenged patient, acute interventions for the chronic-care patient, and assessment-based management. Ambulance operations, medical incident command, rescue awareness and operations, hazardous materials, and incidents along with crime scene awareness are discussed. This course goes beyond the DOT curriculum, and a discussion of rural EMS concludes this course. Lecture 3 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1521 - Introduction to Clinical Areas


    Credits: 1
    This course consists of supervised rotations through selected clinical areas. It emphasizes developing and improving skills to reinforce classroom instruction. Clinical areas that need emphasizing include Emergency Department and OR/Recovery. Specific skills practiced during this time include I. V. therapy, intubations, and EKG recognition. Clinical 5 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1542 - Paramedic Clinical Practicum I


    Credits: 2
    This is a supervised rotation in clinical settings. It emphasizes the application of previous course work in the clinical environment. Clinical areas emphasized include the Emergency Department, OR/Recovery, Critical Care, Labor and Delivery, and others that provide the patient contacts needed to meet the ALS curricula. The student will be able to use skills learned in the previous semester. Specific skills to be practiced during this time include patient assessment, endotracheal intubations, medication administration, and EKG recognition. Clinical 10 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1551 - Paramedic Clinical Practicum II


    Credits: 1
    This course uses situational simulations to help students apply their knowledge and skills in a mock situation. This type of system helps students prepare for their field internship. The indication and administration of cardiac drug therapy along with defibrillation and synchronized cardioversion is covered and practiced in this course. Clinical 1 hour per week. Prerequisite(s): EMS 1542  Paramedic Clinical Practicum I.
  
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    EMS 1561 - Introduction to Field Internship


    Credits: 1
    This is a supervised rotation that introduces the EMS system and the service with which the student will be doing field internship. During this phase the student functions as a team member and be evaluated as such. Clinical 5 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1564 - Field Internship


    Credits: 4
    This is a supervised experience in pre-hospital care settings. It emphasizes the application of previous course work in the field environment. During this time the student applies the knowledge and skills learned during the year. This is a true field internship experience for the student, who must demonstrate the ability to serve as the team leader. The evaluation is based on the student’s ability to act as the team leader of an ALS unit providing the appropriate care in the pre-hospital setting. Clinical 20 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1631 - Paramedic Skills Lab I


    Credits: 1
    This course consists of laboratory exercises that sharpen the skill level of paramedic students in patient assessment, venous access, airway management, and cardiac emergencies. This skill lab provides students the opportunity to practice those skills that will be expected when they enter the practicum. Laboratory 5 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1632 - Paramedic Skills Lab II


    Credits: 2
    This course uses situational simulations to help students apply their knowledge and skills in a mock situation to help students prepare for their field internship. The indication and administration of cardiac drug therapy along with defibrillation and synchronized cardioversion is covered and practiced in this course. Laboratory 10 hours per week.
  
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    EMS 1641 - Paramedic Skills Lab III


    Credits: 1
    This course uses situational simulations to help students apply their knowledge and skills in a mock situation. This lab helps the students to prepare for their certification exam. Laboratory 5 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): EMS 1632  Paramedic Skills Lab II.

Engineering

  
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    GNEG 1013 - Introduction to Engineering


    Credits: 3
    This introductory course for undergraduates introduces the fields of engineering and many of the modeling and problem solving techniques used by engineers. It also introduces the students to the engineering profession and some of the computer tools necessary for pursuing a degree in engineering. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): MAT 1223 , College Algebra or higher. Co-requisite: students must be enrolled in the University of Arkansas’ STEM Preparatory Program.

English

  
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    ENGL 1013 - English Composition I


    Credits: 3
    In this course students read and discuss professional essays and then write clear, concise, well developed expository essays of their own based upon reading and discussion. Instruction guides the student through the preparation and writing of a series of essays as well as a research paper following the MLA format. Students will also complete mastery benchmark exams to demonstrate their competence in the use of grammar, punctuation, and writing strategies. Lecture 3 hours per week. See Placement Chart (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 1013 Composition I)
  
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    ENGL 1023 - English Composition II


    Credits: 3
    Instruction continues (from ENGL 1013 ) to emphasize developing students’ writing skills. Students write a minimum of five essays in response to readings in the literary genres of prose fiction, drama, and poetry. Students prepare and write a research paper dealing with a book-length literary work. An honors section is available. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in ENGL 1013   (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 1023 Composition II)
  
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    ENGL 1033 - Technical Report Writing


    Credits: 3
    This course emphasizes developing the student’s ability to write clearly, concisely, and accurately. The student studies and writes short technical reports, technical proposals, abstracts,  business letters, a resume, and a formal research report. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in ENGL 1013 . (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 2023  Introduction to Technical Writing)
  
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    ENGL 2013 - American Literature I


    Credits: 3
    English 2013, American Literature I, surveys the chief literary works produced in America from colonial times to 1865. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1023  with a “C” or higher or permission of instructor. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 2653 American Literature I)
  
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    ENGL 2023 - American Literature II


    Credits: 3
    English 2023, American Literature II, surveys the chief literary works produced in America from 1865 to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1023 with a “C” or higher or permission of instructor; ENGL 2013 is not a prerequisite for ENGL 2023.  (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 2663 American Literature II)   
  
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    ENGL 2213 - World Literature I


    Credits: 3
    This is a survey course that acquaints students with outstanding works from the ancient world through the Medieval Period and into the Renaissance that have had a wide appeal outside the countries in which they originated. Students are also introduced to various ways of approaching literature, including the mythological and archetypal approach, the historical and biographical approach, and the formalistic approach. Lecture 3 hours per week.

    Honors section available. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1023  with a “C” or higher or permission of instructor; 2213 is not prerequisite for ENGL 2223 . (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 2113 World Literature I)

  
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    ENGL 2223 - World Literature II


    Credits: 3
    This is a sequence that acquaints students with outstanding works from 1660 to present, with an emphasis on the Enlightenment Period, Romanticism, Naturalistic and Realism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. The works studied have had a wide appeal outside the countries in which they originated. Students are also introduced to various ways of approaching literature, including the mythological and archetypal approach, the historical and biographical approach, and the formalistic approach. Lecture 3 hours per week. Honor section available. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1023  with a “C” or higher or permission of instructor; ENGL 2213  is not prerequisite for 2223. (ACTS Department/Number/Title - ENGL 2123 World Literature II)
 

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